A Simple Guide to Paracords

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Ropes are almost as essential as knives in survival situations, and the best rope for survival settings is the paracord. You can always have access to cables, as a paracord can be woven into bracelets or belts that can provide more than a hundred feet of rope.

Why Paracords?

Paracords are lightweight and durable. A single cord has a minimum breaking point of over 550 lbs, enough to hold your weight and then some. You can even get stronger paracords that are rated with a breaking point of 750 lbs, but these can be significantly more expensive. A 7-inch paracord bracelet can provide you with 7 feet of rope, and a paracord belt can provide you with over 50 feet of cord. Of course, these lengths are for the most basic designs, and more complex weaves can give you more rope. Simple paracord projects like bracelets and belts ensure that you will always have the rope at hand in case of any emergencies. Paracords are weatherproof, smooth to the touch, and won’t easily break, making them perfect for outdoor use.

Traps, Lines, and Nets

red rope use in an event

Learning to set traps for small prey is an essential skill for every survivalist. Paracords are an excellent option for setting these traps, and its 500-lbs breaking point is enough to hold down the strongest of prey. Just avoid using colored paracords, especially the brighter ones, as they would easily stand out and might spook your prey. Away from the woods, paracords also make good fishing lines. They sink when wet, especially with a lure, and aside from a bit of shrinking (if you haven’t prepared them beforehand), water doesn’t have another effect. If you have enough paracord, you can even fashion a net for an easier catch. Paracords are also useful when it’s time to cook your catch. Bow drills are some of the most efficient methods of starting a fire, requiring no unique materials, just wood. You can even use paracords in building makeshift racks to smoke your fish or meat for preservation.

Bringing Down Larger Prey

Whether it’s for defensive purposes or sustenance, you might need to bring down larger animals. For those purposes, one of the best weapons you can use is a bow. Bows require a little bit of skill, but they allow you to take down larger animals from a safe distance. You can easily fashion a fully-functional bow by merely using bamboo and the paracord in one of your bracelets. Cut and split the bamboo into the right size, notch the ends, and use your paracord as a string. You can use the younger bamboo as arrow shafts and fit them with arrowheads made from harder pieces of bamboo. Though it might not have a 40-lbs draw weight, it can still take down deer or similar-sized animals.

A paracord is an excellent tool for survival, and integrating it into your clothing as belts or bracelets ensures that you’ll never be without a rope no matter where you go or what situation you’ll face.

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